Test: Plug’n Find

Bluetooth-linked thing hunters are becoming increasingly popular and Stick’n Find belongs to the very smoothest.

We have not come up with a better word for this kind of stuff than just “thing Hunter”, but it may do so for a long time. Simply bluetooth-equipped small pucks that will help you keep track of your stuff.

In its most basic form, you can only look up the puck and the key, wallet, pooch or what it now sits on. Other units are a bit larger and also allows you to locate your phone via a button if you’d like it.

Stick ‘n Find began as a project of crowd funding site Indiegogo and since a while back a physical product. There are a couple of different products in their series, which we have tested their standard puck with battery life of around a year.

The small Puck, just over a dime in size, attached to some Samsung phones, but mainly to Ios devices because of Androids so far lack bluetooth 4.0 support (or rather, manufacturers’ sluggishness to embrace Android 4.3, but that’s another story). The app in question is not entirely the most logical, but after that we paired the two accompanying the puck with the handset does it all without any problems.

In addition to a small puck with double-sided tape on comes with a small plastic tray so you can pin the puck on the keychain, and right size makes the puck to one of the most convenient devices in this category. The devices can be set to only search the command or to act as virtual leash if the puck is going too far away from the phone, which is pretty standard. The downside is that you do not have a button to look up your phone in style with what Kensington Proximo do, but for one-way communication, they work cleanly.

The price tag of 399 kroner feels quite reasonable for two sensors and when the battery died after some years of use, you can easily replace the battery yourself.

Facts:

Name: Stick ‘n Find

Dimensions: 24×4 mm

Weight: 4.5 g

Battery life: 1 year (CR2016 battery)

Range: 30 m

Compatibility: IOS (Iphone 4, Ipad 3 and later), the occasional Samsung phones